Leadership – Education – Technology – Other Interesting Stuff

Posts tagged ‘science’

3 Science Resources

In doing some research this fall, I came across 3 science resources.

Next Generation Science Standards: I was in a workshop last year when a teacher started talking about NGSS – an acronym new to me then. This site is an everything-you-want–to-know-about-NGSS. The story of the evolution of science standards along with questions is found on this site.

Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth: Business class, preparation for summer break or talking with students and parents, this site from Johns Hopkins provides reports, articles, fact sheets and suggestions.

Garden.org: Sponsored by the National Gardening Association this site offers free, plant-based materials, grants and resources. NGA resources expand knowledge in a variety of areas to include science, social studies, leadership, problem solving and team building, to name a few.

 

Advertisements

Formative assessment…Science simulations…Summer reading…Online portfolios

Colorado Commissioner of Education Robert Hammond and the Colorado State Library are urging educators and families to help students retain and develop academic skills by reading during summer vacation. The free online “Find a Book, Colorado” utility provides a way for parents and children to quickly and easily search books that match a child’s reading level and interests as well as to locate the local library carrying each title.

I first ‘met’ Chris Smith at some lectures in Second Life. Like me, Chris is a curator of information with a focus on technology in education. In fact, his Twitter account identifies him as a Digital Nomad Evangelist if that provides a clue as to his passion for the subject.

Long before I learned about formative assessment, I taught computer classes. When students had a problem they placed a red plastic cup on top of their monitor (and yes, this was way before monitors were an inch thick). This was a signal to me that they needed help. If you have seen, heard about or used red-yellow-green cards, disks or cups in your class to allow students to signal you where they are with the learning, you have an idea about this new app (of course there is an app for this). However, I would love to get your comments about this idea. Understoodit says that students can “anonymously, and in real-time, indicate if they understand or are confused.” Why would anonymity be a good thing with this tool? Please share your thoughts about this.

While I attended and worked at the University of Colorado Denver, the Boulder campus has some pretty cool science simulations, at PHET. Physics, biology, earth science, math and chemistry comprise the library. This site is the recipient of The Tech Award 2011

Is an online mixed media portfolio a scrapbook, portfolio, resume or progress monitoring tool? While I haven’t decided it definitely looks interesting to me. Pathbrite has a site that makes you think and a tool to provide a different way to capture who you are and what you bring to the table.

My friend Tom brought me to O’Reilly Radar where I discovered to interesting blogs. The first on “Teachers as Makers where hands-on learning is demonstrated to help teach writing.”

And the second, which is a long-time favorite topic of mine and one that I used to earn my Master’s degree, is about Marie Bierede talks about DIY learning and three groups of people leading us into more personalized learning. Funny thing is, I have been on this path since I got back into teaching in the mid-90s. Her term “edupunk” got me thinking.

Tag Cloud