Leadership – Education – Technology – Other Interesting Stuff

Posts tagged ‘data visualization’

5 Infographics plus Kathy Schrock – death penalty, pizza, public data, bars and groceries, basketball moves

An eye for an eye? From The Washington Post we’re given a visual of what the death penalty results have been since 1977. Read all of the explanations for a clear understanding of the data.

While I thought I went for the large pizza for one reason, it appears there may be another. 74,476 Reasons You Should Always Get The Bigger Pizza To view and use the interactive data, be sure to use Chrome.

Informing Communities by Infographics in the Street  Andrew Vande Moere shared this story about a community project that combined citizen participation and public data visualization. My wondering was how effective (and cool) this would be to do at a school, district office or college campus.

Where Bars Outnumber Grocery Stores: Originally from Floating Sheep, Nathan Yau expanded on the questions and the maps to take the visuals to new places. One topic of personal interest has been food deserts in metropolitan areas. I wonder how these maps might provide even more insight at a more local level.

Game on! Many of us have watched sporting events or game tapes and seen the interaction. Some of us have watched the commentators draw the lines on the screen to explain the movements of players. How many of us have done the same is it relates to classroom interactions? While I have collected that data for teachers before, my hand-drawn arrows on the paper would have been so much more dynamic with a tool like this. Be sure to watch the clip about halfway down the page.

And you know me and assessment…Kathy Schrock has a great page of resources about using Infographics as a Creative Assessment, which includes videos, books, sites, examples and many other resources.

Infographics for Education – learning theories, PBL & pie charts

I seem to be stuck on a theme right now of infographics, both for a current work project and what I am viewing online.

Jeff Dunn shared A Visual Guide to Every Single Learning Theory from Robert Millwood, which is a bit challenging to read but really intriguing.

friEdTechnology has great infographics. For those of you interested in PBL (Project Based Learning) you may want to take a look at this one about the Student Choice Continuum (Aug 17th). Or scroll down to July 25th and look at the scaffold for writing a driving question for PBL. You might also want to go back to Jeff Dunn to see the fried table comparing projects to PBL.

And let’s end with this one – a pie video about pie charts using pies – pretty creative.

Data Visualization

Making sense of abstract numbers…For users of Chrome, Google now has the Dictionary of Numbers. This unique extension searches what you are reading online, finds numbers, gives them context (i.e., 100m = height of the Statue of Liberty) and makes an annotation for you. These translations are called “human numbers.”

It surprised me to find this link on The Economist and now I am not sure why. Data visualization or infographics take us to new vistas when it comes to how to translate and see data. This article describes three books that might feed your interest and appreciation for data/statistics.

 

Infographics & Inquiry Learning

  • Watch this 6.5 min video about the distribution of wealth in US. It provides some interesting data for thought and conversation.
  • Found a couple of new blogs recently with a focus on infographics. Check out I Love Charts and This is Indexed.
  • Jessica Hagy illustrates for us How to Be More Interesting (In 10 Simple Steps). My wondering is how we might use simple graphics in the classroom. How might we get students (or colleagues) to think beyond text?
  • In my online coaching course we used 6 Word Stories as part of introducing ourselves and building trust. This is an activity I will be using again – for getting to know folks and perhaps for formative assessment. Today I found 3 Word Stories.
  • Mind/Shift, the education blog from KQED (an NPR station) seems to have lots of interesting stories. This latest one – Creating Classrooms We Need: 8 Ways into Inquiry Learning – provides 8 steps from Diana Laufenberg’s recent TED Talk. Ideas 1-5 were of particular interest to me.

Infographics…Educators Online…Snow Globes

Jeff Clark has taken the concept of analyzing text in some vastly more refined directions than tag clouds and wordles. His recent post – Novel Views: Les Miserables – displays character mentions, word connections, word clouds and characteristic verbs (for primary characters).

Made me curious about how kids would respond to tasks like these – a DIY experiment of how graphs can be represented with paper – not on paper, but with paper. You might chuckle over the “pie chart already eaten” link. Or the origami pieces that represent the world internet usage statistics.

The 2013 Gallup Student Poll on student engagement takes place between Oct. 1 and Nov. 1. Participation is free and interested schools can find more information about the poll here. The 2012 results showed that student engagement lessens with each grade. What leads to disengagement for students in your setting? While many have written about student engagement, the use of formative assessment practices is one way to get the classroom learning team engaged – peers serving as instructional resources, student directing their own learning based on where they need and want to go and the feedback they receive along the way, teachers adjusting during instruction as they learn more about what students know and don’t know.

Renee Jain’s post on resilience connects to a couple of other topics for me – student engagement and coaching. Our cognitive style connects to both, as does self-awareness. Self-awareness is also a piece of formative assessment; students know where they are in their learning and being able to outline the course to get them where they want to be.

John Klugin recommends some free tech tools for educators – enhanced video production, more efficient storage, Slide Rocket – a presentation tool and Symbaloo for establishing a web presence.

Having recently started an online course through Powerful Learning Practice, I was surprised to find this FETC article – Bringing Passion and Collaboration to Professional Development. This quote from Sheryl Nussbaum-Beach in the article – “One of the things I tell [teachers] is that I don’t want you to change anything about your teaching. I want you to change everything about your learning, and do that first.”  Gives you something to consider…

This short report – 8 Helpful Tech Tools for the Common Core – has some useful sites for teachers implementing CCSS.

Are you an educator using Pinterest like me? If so you may want to check this out – The 25 Best Pinterest Boards in Educational Technology. It is clear I need to be updating my boards soon!

This descriptor – The Khan Academy videos made a stir when they arrived on the educational stage. But are they a paradigm shift or an old model in new clothes? – caught my attention in THE Journal. If you are interested, check out The Math of Khan in the latest issue. Peter Kelman’s comments about “amateur educators” are interesting. Both sides of the coin are shared in the article, along with how schools and districts are using Khan Academy.

See your house in a snow globe!?!?! This came from a friend (and you may have already seen it) with this note, “I’m sure they used Google Earth, or a similar program. But it is clever!” But how in the world could this be – from a front view???

Infographics – economy & science

The first thing that got my attention about this NY Times article is the title – Why Is Her Paycheck Smaller? Then the trend in the graphic reminded me of lines I see in student achievement and student growth data.

THIS is just too cool! If you are near Grand Central Terminal in NYC you should take time to see the 3D infographics display. And if you are not going there, take the time to watch these short videos (each under 3 minutes). If you teach economics, geography, history, statistics, or any “global” thinking course, how might you use this information? What can we do in education to engage all stakeholders at this level with the mounds of data to which we have access? Next step…once engaged, what paradigm changes or disruptive innovations can we cause such that ALL kids learn and grow the most they can?

  • FT Graphic World Live – project installation and beginning
  • The Global Economy – fascinating statistics about everything from education to drinking worldwide
  • Recession and Recovery – the rays of light in global economy
  • Money Talks – cell phones transforming world economy

 The details about this display are found at Financial Times Graphic World.

 The Scientific Visualization Studio is a repository of engaging visualizations of a variety of earth and space science from the Goddard Space Flight Center. Due to the dry weather winter we’ve had, this one about snowfall caught my attention.

Because I recently shared a different kind of visual about the ocean, this one about ocean currents also caught my attention.

Just a quick shout out to Nathan Yau and his Flowing Data blog, which I have followed for a couple of years now. Many of the infographics shared here were found as a result of his blog.

Data in different forms…

Swimming or drowning in data?

Recent interview with Matt Wahl of the Khan Academy on recent stats and partnerships

The role and gestures of conductors — Where was this video when I was trying to teach myself conducting? That was a class I had missed and when I got my first teaching job as a band director, it turns out the book I used to teach myself had the photos printed backwards. C’est la vie! —  

The “empty chair” is the ultimate “boss” at Amazon. How many other companies employ this physical philosophy?

 Would you (could you already) have fired Steve Jobs?

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